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Pentagon Petal programme

Reference: P3243 | Type: Publication

Programme for the installation project by artist Fran Cottell and architect Marianne Mueller, reflecting on the Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground as the dream site for Jeremy Bentham's experimental panopticon, the real Millbank Penitentiary, a military parade ground and now university campus, outdoor gallery and thoroughfare to Tate Britain. 
 

A Field Guide for Female Interrogators

Artist/Author: Coco Fusco | Reference: P3120 | ISBN: 978-1583227800 | Type: Publication

Combining an art project with critical commentary, Fusco addresses the role of women in the war on terror and explores how female sexuality is being used as a weapon against Islamic terrorists. Using details drawn from actual accounts of detainee treatment in US military prisons, Fusco conceives a field guide of instructional drawings that prompts questions regarding the moral dilemma of torture in general and the use of female sexuality specifically.

Part of the Study Room Guide on Live Art and Displacement (P3107).
 

Media Parasites in the Early Avant-Garde: On the Abuse of Technology and Communication

Artist/Author: Arndt Niebisch | Reference: P3103 | ISBN: 978-1137276858 | Type: Publication

Niebisch retraces how the early Avant-Garde movements started out as parasites inhabiting and irritating the emerging mass media circuits of the press, cinema, and wired and wireless communication.

The Post War Orchestra

Artist/Author: Hilary Champion | Reference: D1953 | Type: DVD

Video document of performance. The Post War Orchestra is a growing ensemble of musical instruments made from recycled military equipment by Hilary Champion: devices once designed to maim and kill could be recycled and turned into musical instruments.

Tatlin’s Whisper #6: Havana version

Artist/Author: Tania Bruguera | Reference: D1534 | Type: DVD

Tatlin’s Whisper #6 (Havana version was a participative action at the central courtyard of the Wifredo Lam Centre (the institution that organizes the Havana Biennial). A stage with a podium, two microphones, and a huge golden-brown curtain as a background were placed at one end. The set was reminiscent of the staple set used by Fidel Castro for his speeches. The microphones were connected to an amplifier with speakers, one of them at the building’s entrance, pointing to the street. Two actors, a woman and a man dressed in Cuban military uniforms, stood at each side of the podium. The woman had a white dove in her hands. Admission to the event was free, but the space was filled with people from the Cuban art world, mainly young artists, students, writers, and Cuban and international visitors to the Biennial. Two handed disposable cameras were handed out to the public by Bruguera to document the event. Then people were summoned to speak their minds on the podium for one minute. In other art contexts this would not have any special relevance. In Cuba, it was an historic event: for the first time in half a century a free public tribune was allowed for people to express their ideas.This documentation has been presented with permission of the artist as part of the Performance Matters, Performing Idea, Performance Lecture Archive; an interactive video archive housed at the Whitechapel Gallery between 2-9 October 2010. The archive looked at examples of the performance lecture as a form of artistic and critical expression and its potential to address a broad range of cultural issues and philosophical ideas.

The Terrorist Scenario and the Theatre of Terrorism

Artist/Author: Jure Stojan | Reference: A0114 | Type: Article

Part of the Performing Action, Performing Thinking edition.

In Slovenian and English.

Part of the Library of Performing Rights (LPR) (P3041).